Today I collaborate with Diane Dutchin, a previous guest on the show, to talk about understanding our intention behind the questions we ask, and how to ask questions that really do challenge how and what we think. Diane shares how her curiosity as a child has transformed over time—from questioning gender roles to questioning her intention. She also talks about grace, and how asking questions reminds her of the grace she can afford others, when she considers the grace she would like to receive.

Diane is launching her own podcast, Women Rising Strong’ later this month (Feb 2018) You can find out more about her work by visiting www.makethemovecoaching.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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Today, to talk about the practice and work of discipline, humility and love, I collaborate with Tejai Moore, singer, songwriter and father of two. He shares with me how growing up in Germany and being exposed to difference, not as a problem, but just as part of life, has shaped his world-view. He also shares his practice of humility and discipline, and how habituating himself in this way helps him as a father and a musician—so much so that they are, in his own word “…now just who I am. It’s nothing that I have to try to do.”

You can check out Tejai’s latest album, ‘Write My Wrongs’ on iTunes, and find out more about how work at www.tejaimoore.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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In this episode I collaborate with John Tsungme Guy, a certified facilitator through Gender Equity & Reconciliation International, to talk about the work of Gender Reconciliation. John shares his insights as a professional and from personal experience, as he reflects on the privileges he has as a cis-gender man, and the marginalisation he's experienced due to racism. His work is informed and supported by Buddhism, in particular, the practice of noticing how we cause harm. A large part of this is bearing witness as a way to transform our understanding of the human condition, to expand it beyond our personal views and opinions to be more open, so we can genuinely be with one another. 

You can learn more about John’s work and connect with him through his website www.johntsungmeguy.com

CN: We discuss sexual harassment and abuse in this episode.

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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This episode is a collaboration with Jessica Pettitt, a diversity trainer with a seriously light-hearted approach. She describes humour as a heartbeat, contributing to a more flexible and spacious way of being. Jess is also full of pithy stuff that she admits sounds a bit like a bumper-sticker, but is totally true, like “I am the best tool anybody has for my work” and “If I’m doing anything because I think it’s going to reduce the amount of fear in the world, at the heart, that’s good” and my personal favourite “When did our ego get involved in the conversation about what is the right thing to do?”

You can connect with Jessica through her website www.goodenoughnow.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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In this episode, I collaborate with Tada Hozumi to examine how we can be wisely selfish by learning how to be in our bodies. They invite us to re-think our whole approach to social action by questioning the effectiveness of things like call-out culture and privilege shaming.

By not thinking transactionally, Tada says we can’t help but take a different approach—one based on emotional self-responsibility. This approach, they say, is one of social restoration, which is collaborative, compassionate and grounded in somatic awareness.

You can connect with Tada and find out more about his work at www.selfishactivist.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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This week’s guest is Abigail Chicken, a member of a corporate sustainability team. It’s Abby’s job to think about conservation and environmental action, but her care and interest in these things was something instilled in her during childhood. In this episode she talks about the importance of stepping up our game in little ways to be part of a solution, a solution that she says, isn’t ever going to come from one single source.

Collective action is needed, of course, but we also need to really change our habits and consumerist way of life if we’re going to make the cultural shift necessary to save our common home, ourselves, and all the other living things with which we share this planet.

You can connect with Abby thought twitter by following her account @baby_chicane

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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Today I welcome back a previous guest on the show, Grace Heavy-Runner to talk about Reconciliation and what that means for us individually, and ultimately, on a wider scale, for the country. Grace’s view is both insightful and thought-provoking. She speaks of the crucial first step towards reconciliation—acknowledging the truth, including the pain of it, and for her, the role that grieving played in her path of healing. On this path was also reconnecting with her own and other Indigenous practices, and learning to speak out fearlessly for change.

Regardless of our cultural identity or on what side of history our ancestors may fall, Grace emphasises the importance of reconciliation as a community movement, in which we all must play a part.

You can listen to Grace’s radio show at CJSW 90.9 fm’s website: https://cjsw.com/program/indigenization-across-the-nation/

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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CN - contains swearing.

In this episode I collaborate with writer Chris Brecheen. He shares his journey of waking, and how he has cultivated awareness of the intersections of his experiences of both privilege and marginalisation.  He shares how he regulates himself in online interactions by taking people in good faith, while also not policing the reactions of others. Largely, he talks about the ongoing work of noticing, whether it’s his own or others’ privilege or marginalisation, and being open and willing to learn.  He also also shares some excellent guidance for anyone who has found themselves thrusts into the spotlight of ‘Internet Fame’—emphasising, possibly unsurprisingly, the importance of self-care when it comes to the balancing act of your personal and private life, and the responsibility that comes from having an online following.

You can learn more about his work and connect with Chris through his website www.chrisbrecheen.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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Today’s episode is a collaboration with a previous guest on Everything is Workable, Lyn Langille, on how to be an ally. The first piece of guidance she gives is the importance of understanding that being an ally isn't something we choose for ourselves. It is something we earn, and to earn it we must do the work of educating ourselves—learning to see the world from another person's shoes, even when we have not walked in them, and learning to see the limitations of our experience. She expands this to include working with people who share the same privileges but are not doing the same work, or think they are, but perhaps haven't gotten as far. No matter who the person is, she says, we can ask 'What is their story?' as a reminder, that until we listen, we can never know.

Lyn Langille is the co-founder of Calgary Trans-Hub and does advocacy and educational work. You can find out more by visiting www.calgarytranshub.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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November 30, 2017

Self-care w/ Jennifer Harkness

Today’s collaborator, to discuss the importance of self-care, is Jennifer Harkness. As a licensed mental health counsellor and registered art therapist specialising in anxiety and trauma, she has a great deal of experience with self-care both professionally and personally. Whether it's the burn-out of compassion fatigue or the overwhelm of vicarious trauma, she offers great insight and guidance for self-care. Her simplest instruction, that 'a little is a lot', is about taking time to notice and meet the needs of our bodies—Stay hydrated, get a good night's sleep, and eat well. And she goes on to explain how this applies even when it comes to being of service. Just because we can't solve all the world's problems, doesn't mean that the littlest thing we do isn't worth doing—learning to change our perception, to understand the value of even the smallest act of kindness, is also self-care. Jennifer Harkness runs workshops on self-care and has presented at various State and National conferences, agencies and schools.

For more detailed information or to connect with Ms. Harkness, visit www.courageoushearthealing.com

Visit www.kaitlynschatch.com to see more of my work in the world.

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